Blog - Page 2 of 4 - Code Compliance


Kidde Recalls Plastic Valve Disposable Fire Extinguishers Due to Potential Failure to Fully Discharge

March 1, 2015

Kidde or Garrison brand, black plastic Zytel® nylon valve disposable fire extinguishers, manufactured between August 2013 and November 2014. The affected fire extinguishers are white or red in color and are either ABC or BC-rated. The Kidde or Garrison logo and serial number are located on the nameplate. The date code is an ink jet 10-digit number stamped on the side of the cylinder near the bottom. Digits 5-9 of this number convey the day and year of manufacture. Affected units will have the following five digits in a date code:
2013: XXXX20413X through XXXX36513X
2014: XXXX00114X through XXXX28814X

The models are as follows:

Description Model Number UPC Code
Kidde 1A 10BC E110, FULL HOME 110 47871662968
Kidde 1A 10BCW E110, FULL HOME 110 47871661497
Kidde 2A 10BC FX210 47871071708
Garrison 2A 10BC 46-0066-6 47871074044
Garrison 5BC 46-0092-2 47871074020
Kidde 5BC E5,M5C, BC5GD 47871662944
Kidde 5BCW E5, M5C, BC5GD 47871661787
Kidde 10BC ELITE 10, ELITE 10 47871662951
Kidde FC110 E110, FULL HOME 110 47871680290

 

Hazard: Kidde has identified a quality issue with black plastic Zytel® nylon valve disposable fire extinguishers. In a small number of instances, Kidde found that a supplier built a component that is out-of-specification. When the lever is pressed and released multiple times, the extinguisher may fail to fully discharge as designed.

Remedy: Replace.

First Alert Zero Waste Stewardship Plan

February 1, 2015


The stewardship plan has been developed by First Alert Canada for a Zero Waste program for smoke, carbon monoxide alarms and/or combination alarms sold in Canada through retail and/or electrical wholesaler channels.

The intent of the program is for EPR: Extended Producer Responsibility which is a product and waste management system in which First Alert Canada– not the consumer or government – takes responsibility for the environmentally safe management of our products when they are no longer useful or discarded.

It creates a safer recycling system and it does not pass the cost of the disposal to the government or the tax payer.

This will be done through a collection system across Canada to collect end-of-life residential-use smoke alarms, carbon monoxide (CO) alarms and combination alarms. The collected alarms will be transported at First Alert Canada’s cost to our facilities for recycling and other ‘greener’ options.

This plan will also outline the communication efforts that will ensure public awareness of the program and give a full explanation to the consumer how to dispose of their old smoke, carbon monoxide alarms and/or combination alarms.

The Zero Waste program will set up a system of depots nationally, that will be within a reasonable location to the majority of consumers. The depots will be set up within national retail locations, electrical distributors and other partners.

Firstalert.ca will have full program information on the website which includes what Zero Waste items are included in the program and how the consumer can return them. A listing of depots will be easily accessible through inputting a consumer’s postal code and a Google map search will occur.

Smoke Alarm Requirements for New Construction…

January 1, 2015

If you are building or renovating a new home under a building permit, be aware of the new smoke alarm amendment to the 2014 Ontario Building Code O. Reg. 332/12 effective January 1, 2015.

All smoke alarms must now be equipped with a visual signaling component that meets NFPA 72, “National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code”.

Since 2014 under the OBC, smoke alarms are also required in each sleeping room and between the sleeping rooms and on every storey.  Smoke alarms must also be installed in hallways that serve a sleeping room.

The smoke alarm installation requirement for existing buildings has not changed.  Under the current Ontario Fire Code O. Reg. 213/07, homes in Ontario must have a working smoke alarm on every storey and outside all sleeping areas.

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3.2.4.22.  Smoke Alarms

(1)  Except as permitted by Sentence (6), smoke alarms conforming to CAN/ULC-S531, “Smoke Alarms”, shall be installed in each dwelling unit and, except for care or detention occupancies required to have a fire alarm system, in each sleeping room not within a dwelling unit.

(2)  At least one smoke alarm shall be installed on each storey and mezzanine of a dwelling unit.

(3)  On any storey of a dwelling unit containing sleeping rooms, a smoke alarm shall be installed in,

(a) each sleeping room, and

(b) a location between the sleeping rooms and the remainder of the storey, and if the sleeping rooms are served by a hallway, the smoke alarm shall be located in the hallway.

(4)  A smoke alarm shall be installed on or near the ceiling.

(5)  Except as permitted by Sentence (6), smoke alarms required by Sentence (1) shall,

(a) be installed with permanent connections to an electrical circuit,

(b) have no disconnect switch between the overcurrent device and the smoke alarm, and

(c) in case the regular power supply to the smoke alarm is interrupted, be provided with a battery as an alternative power source that can continue to provide power to the smoke alarm for a period of not less than seven days in the normal condition, followed by 4 min of alarm.

(6)  …

(7)  …

(8)  If more than one smoke alarm is required in a dwelling unit, the smoke alarms shall be wired so that the actuation of one smoke alarm will cause all smoke alarms within the dwelling unit to sound.

(9)  A smoke alarm required by Sentence (1) shall be installed in conformance with CAN/ULC-S553, “Installation of Smoke Alarms”.

(10)  …

(11)  …

(12)  …

(13)  Smoke alarms described in Sentence (1) shall have a visual signaling component conforming to the requirements in 18.5.3. (Light, Color and Pulse Characteristics) of NFPA 72, “National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code”.

 

9.10.19.  Smoke Alarms

9.10.19.1.  Required Smoke Alarms

(1)  Smoke alarms conforming to CAN/ULC-S531, “Smoke Alarms”, shall be installed in each dwelling unit and in each sleeping room not within a dwelling unit.

(2)  Smoke alarms described in Sentence (1) shall have a visual signaling component conforming to the requirements in 18.5.3. (Light, Color and Pulse Characteristics) of NFPA 72, “National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code”.

 

9.10.19.3.  Location of Smoke Alarms

(1)  Within dwelling units, sufficient smoke alarms shall be installed so that,

(a) there is at least one smoke alarm installed on each storey, including basements, and

(b) on any storey of a dwelling unit containing sleeping rooms, a smoke alarm is installed,

(i) in each sleeping room, and

(ii) in a location between the sleeping rooms and the remainder of the storey, and if the sleeping rooms are served by a hallway, the smoke alarm shall be located in the hallway.

(2)  A smoke alarm required in Sentence (1) shall be installed in conformance with CAN/ULC-S553, “Installation of Smoke Alarms”.

(3)  Smoke alarms required in Article 9.10.19.1. and Sentence (1) shall be installed on or near the ceiling.

Certified vs. Uncertified Solid-Fuel Burning Appliances

December 1, 2014

A solid-fuel burning  appliance that has been tested and certified as complying with a safety standard will carry a label specifying minimum clearances to combustible material.  These clearances are determined by firing the solid-fuel appliance at peak output and measuring the temperatures on the test enclosure walls, floors and ceiling.  These clearances are almost always accepted as safe by the regulatory authorities.

There are only two main standard-writing organizations in the field of solid fuels however, there are four recognized testing and certification agencies; CSA, ULC, OTL and Warnock Hersey Professional Services.

To have a product certified, the manufacturer submits a sample for testing to the certification agency, along with engineering drawings, promotional brochures and an installation manual.  The agency then performs the tests specified in the safety testing standard and, if the appliance meets the requirements, the procedure continues.

The installation manual is then checked for accuracy and completeness of information, such as the warnings and cautions required by the standard.

When all the work is completed, the agency prepares a test report documenting its findings.  The testing agency then sells the approved certification label to the manufacturer.  The certification agency places strict conditions on the production of appliances and the use of the label.

The certification agency has a direct stake in the quality and consistency of the products bearing its logo on the label.  The label confirms that the product meets a safety standard.

Technicians and inspectors should follow the rule of the certification agencies; that a product is not certified unless the label is attached.

Carbon Monoxide Alarms

November 1, 2014

Protect your family with carbon monoxide alarms; it’s the law in Ontario. If your home has a fuel-burning appliance or an attached garage, you must have a working CO alarm adjacent to each sleeping area of the home.
For added protection, install one on every storey of your home according to manufacturer’s instructions that also identify when CO alarms need to be replaced.

 

SECTION 2.16  INSTALLATION OF CARBON MONOXIDE ALARMS

Subsection 2.16.1.  Application and Responsibility

Application

2.16.1.1.  (1)  Subject to Sentence (2), this Section applies to every building that contains a residential occupancy and

(a) a fuel-burning appliance,

(b) a fireplace, or

(c) a storage garage.

(2)  This Section applies

(a) as of April 15, 2015, in the case of buildings that contain no more than six suites of residential occupancy, and

(b) as of October 15, 2015, in the case of buildings that contain more than six suites of residential occupancy.

Landlord is responsible

2.16.1.2.  Despite the definition of owner in Article 1.4.1.2. of Division A, in the case of a rental dwelling unit, including a rental dwelling unit subject to Section 9.8, only the landlord shall be considered to be the owner for the purpose of applying Article 1.2.1.1. of Division A to this Section.

 

Subsection 2.16.2.  Installation Requirements

Installation requirements

2.16.2.1.  (1)  If a fuel-burning appliance or a fireplace is installed in a suite of residential occupancy, a carbon monoxide alarm shall be installed adjacent to each sleeping area in the suite.

(2)  If a fuel-burning appliance is installed in a service room that is not in a suite of residential occupancy, a carbon monoxide alarm shall be installed

(a) in the service room, and

(b) adjacent to each sleeping area in each suite of residential occupancy that has a common wall or common floor/ceiling assembly with the service room.

(3)  If a building contains a storage garage, a carbon monoxide alarm shall be installed adjacent to each sleeping area in each suite of residential occupancy that has a common wall or common floor/ceiling assembly with the storage garage.

(4)  A carbon monoxide alarm shall

(a) be permanently connected to an electrical circuit with no disconnect switch between the overcurrent device and the carbon monoxide alarm,

(b) be battery-operated, or

(c) be plugged into an electrical receptacle.

(5)  A carbon monoxide alarm shall meet the requirements of CAN/CSA-6.19, “Residential Carbon Monoxide Alarming Devices” or UL 2034, “Single and Multiple Station Carbon Monoxide Alarms”.

(6)  A carbon monoxide alarm shall be mechanically fixed, attached, plugged in or placed at the manufacturer’s recommended height or, if the manufacturer has not recommended a height, on or near the ceiling.

(7)  A carbon monoxide alarm that is installed adjacent to a sleeping area shall be equipped with an alarm that is audible throughout the sleeping area, even if any doors between the carbon monoxide alarm and any parts of the sleeping area are closed.

CO Alarms Mandatory in Residential Homes Beginning Today

October 15, 2014

Carbon-Monoxide-Detector-540x400[1]

Bill 77 updates the Ontario’s Fire Code requiring CO alarms near all sleeping areas and in service rooms if the dwelling is equipped with a fuel-fired appliance or an attached garage.

The alarms can be hardwired, battery-operated or plugged into the wall and will help alert families about the silent killer.

CO is odourless and colourless and mimics the same symptoms as the flu such as, nausea, headache, light-headed, and sleepiness.

More than 50 people die from carbon monoxide poisoning each year in Canada. The first Carbon Monoxide Awareness Week is November 1-8.

How do you dispose of used ionization smoke alarms?

September 1, 2014

An international study by radiation safety experts determined that domestic smoke alarms would not pose a health or safety threat to the public, or to waste disposal workers, if they were thrown out with regular garbage.

There is therefore no need for any special care in the disposal of used smoke alarms. They can be safely included with other household waste for disposal.

Fire Code Inspection vs. Retrofit Inspection….

August 1, 2014

Division B Part 9, the retrofit section of the Ontario Fire Code, was adopted almost 20 years ago under Ontario Regulation 627/92. The retrofit requirements of Part 9 in its adoption provided building owners a period of two years in which to comply with the new requirements. The new Code changes essentially were fire protection upgrades for existing buildings to meet a higher minimum performance requirement for life safety.

Since the early adoption of Division B Part 9, there have been additional amendments to further enhance the changing fire protection and safety requirements of existing buildings.  The most recent being Ontario Regulation 150/13 that now requires Long Term Care & Treatment Facilities to sprinkler their buildings by January 1, 2025.  Care or Retirement Homes must be fully sprinklered by January 1, 2019.

A Fire Code inspection goes beyond the application of Division B Part 9 Retrofit to include the provisions of the entire Ontario Fire Code.  For example, Division B Part 2 provides measures for the safety of persons, the elimination or control of fire hazards, and the maintenance of life safety systems.  Division B Part 6 applies to installation, checking, inspection, testing, maintenance and operation of fire protection equipment and life safety systems.

There are many buildings in existence today that are still not retrofitted.  Typically, these buildings “raise a red flag” during a real estate transaction or when the authority having jurisdiction (AHJ) receives a complaint or a request for a building inspection.  Completing a retrofit today to bring a building into compliance can be expensive, not to mention the potential for fines, penalties and legal fees should the AHJ decide to prosecute for contravening the Ontario Fire Code.     

To determine if your building required a retrofit, refer to the menu bar within the Retrofit Inspection icon on our web site to find your building applications.

Fireworks and Safety…

July 1, 2014

0705-Fireworks-safety_full_600(1)

Before purchasing fireworks to launch at the backyard family get together on July 1st, keep in mind that hand held sparklers burn at 650 0C while water boils at 100 0C and glass melts at 480 0C.

Fireworks and sparklers may also be prohibited in your municipality so you should check with your local authority having jurisdiction.

The best way to enjoy fireworks is by attending a professional fireworks display where the fireworks are under a controlled setting and monitored by public safety officials.

The National Fire Protection Association reports that nearly 90 percent of emergency room visits involving fireworks-related injuries are caused by fireworks that consumers are permitted to use. The risk of fireworks injury is highest for children between the ages of 5 and 19 and adults between the ages of 25 and 44.

 

Safety tips include:

      • Keeping a bucket of water nearby for emergencies and for pouring on fireworks that do not go off;
      • Never try to relight or handle malfunctioning fireworks;
      • Be sure all people are out of range before lighting fireworks;
      • Do not light fireworks in a container (especially glass or metal containers);
      • Keep unused fireworks away from firing areas;
      • Always read the directions and warning labels on fireworks; and
      • Closely supervise children around fireworks at all times.

 

The most common cause of fireworks related injuries is people not maintaining a safe zone when they are near lit fireworks and not maintaining a water source.  

 

 

 

Lithonia Lighting Recalls Emergency Lights Due to Fire Hazard

June 1, 2014

Recall Details

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Description

This recall involves the Quantum® series ELM and ELM2 emergency light fixtures. They are about 12.5-inches wide, 5-inches high and 3.75-inches deep in white or black plastic and have two incandescent lights and a rechargeable lead acid battery. ELM or ELM2 appears on the label inside the fixture’s plastic housing above the battery. The recalled units have circuit boards that are green on both sides and either Rev B or Rev C printed in the top left corner. Emergency lights with circuit boards that are beige on one side and ELM2 LED, ELM2 SD and ELM2 WRS fixtures are not included in the recall.

Incidents/Injuries

Lithonia Lighting has received 29 reports of circuit boards overheating and fixtures melting or catching fire, with one incident resulting in more than $100,000 of property damage to an office building. No injuries have been reported.

Remedy

Consumers should contact Lithonia Lighting to receive detailed instructions on how to locate the circuit board and series name and to order a free repair kit, which includes a new circuit board.

Sold at

Electrical distributors, The Home Depot, W.W. Grainger, Inc. stores and other retailers nationwide and online at grainger.com and amazon.com from March 2010 through February 2014 for between $35 and $55.

Manufacturer

Acuity Brands Lighting, of Conyers, Ga.